Introducing SF Beta Office Hours

So, I've got this idea for a website.

So, I’ve got this idea for a website.

Are you an early-stage founder? Drop by SF Beta Office Hours each Friday to chat about your idea with Christian Perry, CEO & Founder of SF Beta. (That’s me!)

How does it work?
Office Hours provide a chance to share your idea, get advice and feedback, and talk about life as a founder — all in a relaxed, informal, one-on-one environment.

Who is eligible?
Office Hours are designed for founders of early-stage startups — companies that are bootstrapped, seed funded, or angel funded.

When and where?
All Office Hours are conducted over Google Hangouts or Skype. Appointments take place every Friday and last approximately 30 minutes each.

How much does it cost?
It’s free, and always will be.

How do I sign up?
Head to our Office Hours page and sign up from there.

Accelerating Business Goals with Vidcaster

Vidcaster helps organizations and enterprises manage, measure, and optimize videos on their sites. We’re joined by Erik Koland and Ryan Kubin to talk about the company’s past, future, and how they help some amazing clients, including AirBNB and MIT. We also discuss the challenges, both technical and cultural, of selling to enterprises, verses SMBs.

Meet the Vidcaster team at #sfbeta :: Data & API Edition on October 1, 2013.

5 Relatively Easy Ways to Run an Awesome WordPress Site

The wonderful world of blogging.

The wonderful world of blogging.

Running a blog takes work — writing the posts, reaching an audience, installing plugins, etc. — not to mention supporting it with the proper infrastructure. #sfbeta relaunched its website earlier this summer on a WordPress backend, and here’s what we advise so far:

1) Host your site on WPEngine — period.
WPEngine will pre-cache your site for faster load times, auto-update every new version, and run extensive back-end security to prevent hacks and exploits. Trust me, you do NOT want to be alone when your site inevitably gets targeted by some asshat 16-year-old-with-a-laptop in Russia.

2) Choose a responsive theme.
When a theme is “responsive,” that means it renders your content with a UI ideal for the reader’s device — whether a laptop, tablet, or smartphone. There are a bunch of responsive themes for free, and plenty for $10 – $50 on ThemeForest. Mobile and tablet traffic are really, really, really, really important, so don’t burn your potential readership with a rigid theme that renders like crap on half your pageviews.

3) Optimize for social sharing.
I recommend Facebook Comments, a share and tweet button for each post, and Facebook / Twitter widgets that show your follower count. Each of these will increase your traffic and exponentially boost your virality, while making it easy for your audience to share your work.

4) Get in the fast lane.
Optimize for speed and performance. Install a CDN, and make your site as efficient and zippy as possible with plugins suited to the task. Not only will slow pages annoy your users, but they’ll lower your standing with Google.

5) Make your site Google-friendly.
Set up Webmaster Tools and Analytics, and make sure that your sitemap is getting properly indexed. Search is a significant (if not dominant) driver of traffic, and must be accounted for.

Any other tips or tricks? Share them in the comments!