Dual-Platform App Strategies with Apportable

Using native code built for your iOS app, Apportable cross-compiles your code to Android, allowing app developers to embrase a dual-platform strategy based on Objective C. Guests include Co-Founder & CTO Ian Fisher, Engineer Adam Hunter, and Engineer Zac Bowling.

Learn more about Apportable

Financial Advice for Bootstrapped Founders

In an interview with the CEO (Jason Gordo) and Marketing Director (Sarah Buhr) of San Francisco startup FlexScore, we discuss the wide world of personal finance, and dive into the ways that FlexScore is bringing financial insight to the 99%, information previously only available to the wealthy.

Sign up for the FlexScore beta.

Announcing #sfbeta :: NYC SocialWeek Edition

Held in San Francisco since 2006, #sfbeta arrives in New York City on Monday, October 14, in partnership with SocialWeek.

Join hundreds of founders, investors, and hackers at The Alley for an evening of awesome people, groundbreaking startups, and illuminating conversation, celebrating the future of social media and the innovators behind it.

Co-produced with longtime friend and collaborator Michael Gold, Founder & Executive Producer of #techdrinkup, you’re invited to join us at the first and only NYC #sfbeta of the year.

#sfbeta provides a curated group of startups with the opportunity to demo throughout the evening. Startups with a social media focus: apply to demo today.

Register now for #sfbeta :: NYC SocialWeek Edition

AngelList Enables Public Fundraising, Thanks to Silicon-Valley-Backed JOBS Act

A secret no longer.

A secret no longer.

Thanks to regulatory changes enacted by the JOBS Act, startups, beginning this Monday, September 23, startups may disclose their fundraising information to the public, rather than to accredited investors alone.

The changes were outlined in an email blast recently sent out to founders on AngelList, with the news freshly arriving in people’s inboxes.

President Obama signed the JOBS Act into law on April 5, 2012, after passing Congress with rare bipartisan support. Backed overwhelmingly by Silicon Valley, and supported by entrepreneurs across the country, the law rewrites and eases a number of regulatory requirements that currently burden emerging companies.

In addition to allowing startups to disclose their fundraising information (and ambitions) to the general public, the JOBS Act facilitates a number of changes that will likely prove a boon to a stagnant economy, including:

  • Increasing from 500 to 2,000 the number of shareholders a company may have before disclosing its common stock to the SEC.
  • Extend from two years to five years the period of exemption allowed for publicly traded startups to comply with the perfectly titled Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the costliest and most controversial measure of the regulatory act.
  • Provide simplified regulatory requirements for fundraising rounds up to $50 million, from a previous limit of $5 million.

Many of these changes have gone into effect already, or, like the public fundraising provision, will take effect soon. Also stipulated in the act is a much-touted measure allowing non-accredited investors to crowdfund companies; however, specific regulations governing this change have repeatedly faced delays.

NoThingsD: Tech Blog Severs Ties with Wall Street Journal. What’s Next?

Journalites no longer.

Journalites no longer.

As reported by Fortune, the influential team behind tech blog AllThingsD — chiefly, Kara Swisher and Walt Mossberg — is severing ties with parent company Dow Jones, owner of the Wall Street Journal, at the end of the year. In addition, Mossberg will cease publishing his column in the newspaper, ending a 20-year tenure at the publication.

One can only speculate about the internal politics that led to the fallout. That said, the announcement leaves the fate of the brand, and the team behind it, in jeopardy, partiularly since Dow Jones will retain the rights to the “AllThingsD” monicker, as Swisher and Mossberg reportedly seek outside capital for what may be a new media venture.

Three predictions on what will happen:

1) Dow Jones will either nominate new leaders from within its organization to run the site, or, more likely, will bring in a well-known outside duo from the blogosphere to take over. It’s difficult to imagine a more coveted position for a tech journalist, but at the same time, when one considers the deep associations between the brand and the two leaders behind it, it’s unclear whether such a strategy would work.

2) Swisher and Mossberg will launch a new tech-focused media site. While traditional, “dead tree” journalism continues to stagnate (as John Oliver quips, citing the recent acquisition of the Washington Post by Jeff Bezos during a widespread decline in print circulation, “there are more people buying newspapers than there are people buying newspapers.”), digital media focused on technology, has a proven history of receiving institutional backing — PandoDaily, TechCrunch, GigaOM, and BostInno, among others, stand among the funded.

3) Other tech writers follow suit. A number of the best tech journalists still work for traditional media outlets — Alexis Madrigal of The Atlantic, for instance — but this needn’t be the case. If the team behind AllThingsD can successfully spin out of their parent company, I wouldn’t be surprised if they started a trend.

For additional coverage, see Matthew Ingram’s coverage on GigaOM.