Record-Setting Attendance Expected at Bain Capital Ventures Open Source Startup Summit

Open Source: Plenty to cheer about.

Just days before the launch of Bain Capital Ventures presents the Open Source Startup Summit, we’re thrilled to announce that we’re expecting more than 1,200 RSVPs — beating our previous records by hundreds.

With a star-studded lineup of speakers, including a keynote by Naval Ravikant, attendees will enjoy a day of deep insights and thought-provoking discussions on the open source startup, and its role in the future of the web.

Meet the 1,200+ OSSS attendees today: http://sfbeta.eventbrite.com

The Oauth.io Interview: Three Clicks, Three Steps, and You’re Done

OAuth, the universal login protocol, was supposed to make life so easy — and now, thanks to Oauth.io, it does.

In the latest @sfbeta On Air interview, Webshell Co-Founder Mehdi Medjaoui tells the story of his life as a rising star in the open source startup universe.

With the power of a simple API, OAuth.io powers integration with over 100 Oauth providers. The process involves three lines of code, and takes about 90 seconds to complete, saving developers headaches, money, and most importantly — their sanity.

Built atop a major open source project, oauthd, Oauth.io relies on this open daemon, built from contributions of developers from across the world. The power of the daemon helps explain why more than 4000 apps already rely on Oauth.io, which streamlines and simplifies what can often be an unwieldy and cumbersome integration process.

Rather than embracing the defensive IP mentality of a proprietary thought regime, Mehdi sees open source as a core strategy to the success of his startup. While acknowledging a more guarded approach may yield better short-term results, Medhi believes that the long-term success of his company depends on the future of the web — and at Oauth.io, he’s jointly invested in both.

Watch the full Oauth.io interview on YouTube.

Bountysource: Continuous Crowdfunding for Open Source Projects

More than ten years ago, David Rappo and Warren Konkel met in an IRC chat room to figure out ways to incentivize open source software development. They built a solution called Bountysource, sent it into the wild, and moved along.

But in the way that projects find a life of their own, Bountysource never died — in fact, it kept growing. So last year, Warren and David gathered all their contributors together, and brought the band back to San Francisco. Once a project, now a full-time startup, Bountysource is the continuous crowdfunding marketplace moving open source forward.

The platform-agnostic service adds a financial incentivization layer across major open source repositories — GitHub, SourceForge, and so on. Through Bountysource, companies and individuals place “bounties” to fix bugs, solve features, and start new projects, ranging from a few dollars to a few thousand.

Popular not just with engaged end users and open source geeks, companies like Facebook and Mozilla place bounties on important bugs to drive attention to them — generating fast, low-cost solutions that would otherwise languish or consume the time of an in-house developer.

Bountysource is for more than fixing bugs — it’s a fundraising platform for entirely new projects. They helped fundraise a campaign for NeoVIM, the modern take on the popular text editor — along with HabitRPG, the open source task management system with gamified RPG elements. Unlike platforms like Kickstarter and IndieGoGo, Bountysource offers continuous crowdfunding, with a funding model that supports the continuous lifecycle of product development.

Some developers love Bountysource because avid users posts bounties on issues that matter to them most. When dealing with dozens, if not hundreds, of potential projects at once — when figuring out what problems to solve can be the biggest problem of all — bounties help developers identify issues that mean the most to their users, while giving users direct input and influence over the direction that a project takes.

The Bountysource team will be showcasing at the BCV Open Source Startup Summit on April 22, and more information can be found at http://bountysource.com

ReAllocate Inspires Hacking for the Social Good

Photo credit: Josh Wolf

Photo credit: Josh Wolf

With a mission to leverage technology for the force of good, the San-Francisco-based non-profit ReAllocate has organized HACKtivation for the Homeless, a weekend-long hackathon uniting techies with San Francisco’s 7000-person homeless and at-risk community.

In typical hackathon fashion, the weekend began with pitches, this time coming from local non-profits and city agencies. Participating techies joined teams that resonated with their passions and areas of expertise.

Gathering on a rainy Saturday at the Yammer HQ in the Twitter building, teams plugged away on a wide range of projects, each designed to have a lasting impact.

One group I spoke with is redesigning the website for St. Francis House, which serves the homeless elderly population. Another group, working for Larkin Street, is building an SMS-based reservation service for emergency beds, bypassing the need to check-in at the building itself. A third group, led by volunteers from Salesforce, is digitizing the Homeless Prenatal volunteer sign-up form, which they estimate will save 20 minutes per applicant.

The hackathon organizers, Kyle Stewart and Ilana Lipsett, organized a groundswell of support from across the community. Participating groups, along with those listed above, include tech organizations like General Assembly, Code for America, and Spotify, along with community-driven allies like Project Homeless Connect, St. Francis Living Room, Hospitality House, and the Mayor’s Office of Civic Innovation.

Naval Ravikant: Keynote on Open Source, Bitcoin, and Cryptocurrency

Such investor! Very founder.

Wow! Such visionary. Very founder!

We’re thrilled to announce our newest keynote at the Open Source Startup Summit: Naval Ravikant, serial entrepreneur, blogger at VentureHacks, and co-founder of AngelList. Naval’s keynote will focus on open source, BitCoin, and the future of cryptocurrency.

In his Wired article, Bitcoin: The Internet of Money, Naval presented his vision for the future of the digital currency, pointing to a number of features and distinct advantages provided by the new platform:

Bitcoins are scarce (Central Banks can’t inflate them away), durable (they don’t degrade), portable (can be carried and transmitted electronically or as numbers in your head), divisible (into trillionths), verifiable (through everyone’s block chain), easy to store (paper or electronic), fungible (each bitcoin is equal), difficult to counterfeit (cryptographically impossible), and can achieve widespread use – many of the technologists that brought us advances on the Internet are now working overtime to improve Bitcoin.

So why not just use Pounds or Dollars? One can use bitcoins as high-powered money with distinct advantages. Bitcoins, like cash, are irrevocable. Merchants don’t have to worry about shipping a good, only to have a customer void the credit card transaction and charge-back the sale. Bitcoins are easy to send – instead of filling forms with your address, credit card number, and verification information, you just send money to a destination address. Each such address is uniquely generated for that single transaction, and therefore easily verifiable. Bitcoins can be stored as a compact number, traded by mere voice, printed on paper, or sent electronically. They can be stored as a passphrase that exists only in your head! There is no threat of money printing by a bankrupt government to dilute your savings. Transactions are pseudonymous – the wallets do not, by default have names attached to them, although transaction chains are easy to trace. It has near-zero transaction costs – you can use it for micropayments, and it costs the same to send 0.1 bitcoins or 10,000 bitcoins. Finally, it is global – so a Nigerian citizen can use it to safely transact with a US company, no credit or trust required.

Silicon Valley knows a platform when it sees it, and is aflame with Bitcoin. Teams of brilliant young programmers, entranced by the opportunity, are working on Exchanges (Payward, Buttercoin, Vaurum), Futures Markets (ICBIT), Hardware Wallets (BitCoinCard, Trezor, etc), Payment Processors (bitpay.com), Banks, Escrow companies, Vaults, Mobile Wallets, Remittance Networks (bitinstant.com), Local Trading networks (localbitcoins.com), and more.

To hear Naval’s keynote live, join us at the Open Source Startup Summit on April 22, and follow us at @sfbeta for ongoing updates.